The Detroit Tigers’ season is effectively over.
They have no hope of making the playoffs and a rebuild is looming. Things may look depressing in the present, so let’s take a look at the future. Most Tigers fans in the past never cared who was in the Tigers’ farm system because they were rarely needed. Why develop the next Miguel Cabrera when you can just trade for him?
Those days are over, and the homegrown talent will shape the future of the organization, for better or worse. Let’s take a look at some of Detroit’s top prospects, according to MLB Pipeline.
No. 1: Matt Manning, RHP, Connecticut Tigers, single-A short season)
Manning was the Tigers’ 9th overall pick in the first round of the 2016 draft. He’s thrown just 10.1 innings so far, giving up seven hits and two earned runs with 15 strikeouts. He’s projected to make the MLB in 2020, so there’s really not much to report yet.
No. 2: Christin Stewart, LF, double-A Erie SeaWolves
Stewart has been flexing his muscles big time. He’s hitting .282 with a team-leading 19 home runs and 60 RBIs. Those gaudy stats earned him a spot in the Eastern League All-Star game, along with OF Mike Gerber (No. 7 prospect), 3B Gabriel Quintana and LHP Jario Labourt (No. 19 prospect), who is also playing in the futures game. Stewart was the 34th pick of the 2015 draft and is projected to make the big leagues sometime next season. Look for him to possibly move to triple-A late in the season and get a shot at making the big league roster next spring training, especially if the Tigers trade JD Martinez or Justin Upton.
No. 3: Beau Burrows, RHP, single-A Lakeland Flying Tigers
Burrows has a dazzling 1.23 ERA in 11 starts. The 20-year-old was Detroit’s first-round pick in 2015 and hasn’t disappointed since. He’s also struck out 62 batters in 58.2 innings of work. MLB Pipeline projects him to make it to the big leagues by 2019 and he’ll be representing the Tigers in the MLB Futures Game during All-Star Weekend in Miami.
No. 4: Tyler Alexander, LHP, double-A Erie SeaWolves
Alexander was drafted out of TCU in the second round of the 2015 draft and has ascended the Tigers’ organization very quickly. He seems to have hit a bit of a rough patch this season though. Alexander is 4-6, with a 4.85 ERA in 15 starts. Opponents are hitting .311 against the southpaw through 72.1 innings. But at age 22, bumps in the road are expected. MLB Pipeline projects him to reach the majors sometime this season, though that seems way too optimistic at this point.
No. 5: Joe Jimenez, RHP, triple-A Toledo Mud Hens
Jimenez, thought to be the heir to the closer role in Detroit sometime in the future, dealt with some nagging injuries early in the season. Since returning to Toledo on June 18, the 22-year-old has made 10 appearances, throwing 7.2 innings and giving up 8 hits and 4 earned runs. That’s not too encouraging, but Jimenez hasn’t given up a run in his last six appearances, so things could be turning around for one of Detroit’s brightest prospects.
Other notables in the minors
Outfielder Jim Adduci was activated from the disabled list and sent to Triple-A Toledo after recovering from an oblique strain. Since returning to the Mud Hens’ lineup on June 26, Adduci is hitting .171 with 4 RBI and 9 strikeouts. Depending on what the Tigers do at the trade deadline with JD Martinez and Upton, we could see Adduci back with the big league club soon. But before that happens, his bat needs to wake up.
LHP Matt Boyd was optioned to Toledo after struggling in the first couple months of the season for the big league club, and he seems to have regained his confidence in the minors. In six starts with the Mud Hens, Boyd is 3-1 with a 2.48 ERA and 39 strikeouts in 36.1 innings of work. Fellow southpaw Daniel Norris has been battered lately and could be demoted to the minors after the All-Star break. If that happens, look for Boyd to take his spot.
Center fielder JaCoby Jones had a cup of coffee in the MLB this season, but a shot to the head knocked him out of the lineup and back to Toledo. His abysmal hitting kept him there. Since then, Jones’ bat has been a bit better. He’s hitting .250 with 6 homers and 23 RBI, much better than his .137 average in 51 major league at-bats. Jones’ outstanding fielding will keep him in the mix if an injury occurs to a Tigers outfielder, but his bat needs to be more consistent before he gets called up full-time.
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